Practicing consensual sex, BDSM will land you on the sex offender registry under a proposed law under the false guise of combating sex trafficking

by jovan1984

dominatrix

Dominatrices are among a large group of people who would be classified as sex offenders under a new bill sponsored by Katrina Shealy (R-Lexington).

COLUMBIA — Are you a kinkster who practices safe BDSM?

That will land you on the state’s sex offender registry if the politicians in Columbia have their way on a bill sponsored by Senator Katrina Shealy (R-Lexington).

Under the false guise of battling sex trafficking, all consensual sex will be classified as a sex offense under a bill that got initial approval last week.  Sex with someone who is classified as “profoundly mentally disabled” – even if it is consensual – will carry enhanced penalties, regardless of whether money is involved or not.

Someone caught a second time having consensual sex of any kind, regardless of circumstance or situation, would have to pay between $500 and $3,000, or face up to six months in jail.  A judge also would have the authority to place the kinkster(s) on a sex offender registry for up to five years.

A third offense would carry a fine between $1,500 and $5,000, and mandate the offender be placed on the registry.  He or she would have to petition a judge to be removed from the list.  All of this, again, regardless of whether money is involved or not.

 Here’s a list of activities that would be criminalized as sex offenses under the Shealy proposal:

  • BDSM, even consensual
  • Cock-and-ball torture, even consensual
  • Female domination, even consensual
  • Sugar baby/Sugar Daddy (Sugar Mama)
  • Cuckold
  • All other fetishes, even consensual
  • All other kinds of sexual activity, even freebies, even consensual

Paying for dates could also classify as a sexual offense requiring registration in the state.

Sex trafficking is a major scourge on our society.  However, we should not be criminalizing payments for sex between consenting adults – let alone classify sex work as sex offenses.  There’s far more effective ways to combat sex trafficking, such as decriminalization of sex work.

Shealy’s plan, and those like them, have failed miserably.  The legislature needs to scrap this bill and try a new approach.

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